Animation Artifacts &Frame Grabs &Story & Storyboards 20 Feb 2008 09:28 am

Peet’s Susie Book 2

- Concluding what I started yesterday, here are the pages of what must be a book that was prepared by Bill Peet. Susie the Little Blue Coupe. I don’t know if it was ever published (there was a Little Golden Book, but this is not it), but, obviously, it became the animated short completed at Disney in 1951.

The plan for this book is excellent, and gives a good indication of the great books Mr. Peet would do after leaving animation. Many thanks to John Canemaker for the loan of this rare material; it makes an unusal post.

11_12
_____________(Click any image you like to enlarge it to a legible size.)

13_14

15_16

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21
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Next week I’ll post Bill Peet’s storyboard for the film.

5 Responses to “Peet’s Susie Book 2”

  1. on 20 Feb 2008 at 11:59 am 1.Tim Hodge said …

    These are great. I was also able to get a copy. When I was a story artist trainee at Disney I could request photocopies of old storyboards for my “education”. I requested a lot of Vance Gerry & Bill Peet work from “101 Dalmatians” & “Jungle Book”. I wish now that I had gotten more.
    Keep this good stuff coming!

  2. on 21 Feb 2008 at 2:44 pm 2.Eddie Fitzgerald said …

    Peet was brilliant! I wish he’d gotten into kids books even earlier than he did!

  3. on 25 Feb 2008 at 1:28 pm 3.Bill Perkins said …

    Great stuff ! I picked up a copy of Peet’s “The Caboose that got Loose” this summer, again terrific. It’s interesting how you can spot a children,s book illustrator who’s had animation background. As a freind of mine said the drawings have a quality of life to them that make them stand out. I’m sure we’ve all seen this – it’s interesting that somewhere along the line (pardon the pun) imbueing a drawing with the quality of life – such as these sketches show – comes out of animation training specifically – perhaps it’s the requirement of being able to do a sound drawing – that captures emotion- quickly, that makes the best animation draftsman capable of that transcendence, making a even single drawing live.

  4. on 25 Feb 2008 at 1:58 pm 4.Michael said …

    I think the primary difference between a traditional illustrator and an animator turned illustrator is weight. The animator is always concerned with proper balance and weight. A character is always in a position that it can stand in the drawing’s balance. There’s also the silhouetting that an animator does. You don’t see this so clear cut and sharply defined as often in illustration.

  5. on 25 Feb 2008 at 10:48 pm 5.Bill Perkins said …

    Hi Mike. Undoubtedly animators are concerned with drawing related issues – weight, balance, appeal, silhouetting that are unique to animation – or certainly a requirement to clear cut and define. The same can be said for Animators turned Comic Book / Comic strip artists / Humorous Illustrators. Walt Kelly is a fine example of this as is Eldon Dendini (Playboy). When I was a kid I was completely blown away by Bob Clampetts “Beany and Cecil” comic books for Dell ( based on the animated series ). Again pencils by Willie Ito who came up through animation and I believe contributed significantly to the look of the animated versions of “Beany and Cecil”. On the flip side of this however is a guy named Warren Kremer who did pencils for Harvey Comics. No animation background that I’m aware of (If you want to see some real eye candy pick up the Harvey comics reprint series -so far there’s Casper and Richie Rich ) an animator of the time was quoted as saying “If Warren had decided to go into animation we would have all been out of work” – no doubt. It is interesting however that the strongest draftsman in print media – or perhaps I should say the ones I’m drawn too as our other friends of mine, usually have animation experience in there backgrounds.

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