Bill Peckmann &Books &Commentary 30 Sep 2009 07:47 am

Snap Crackle Pop


The original Snap, Crackle and Pop

- Vernon Grant was the designer of the three elves who’ve appeared on the Rice Krispies package since 1928.

Snap, Crackle and Pop have gone through many incarnations since their debut. Their ears and noses have been reduced and softened, and their costumes have changed significantly.


Two other variations found on liine. The left animated at Playhouse Pictures in the Fifties.

A couple of commercials can be found on YouTube. Naturally enough, the quality degenerates chronologically.
#1, #2, #3, #4, #5

In 1939, Snap, Crackle and Pop starred in a short called Breakfast Pals. In the 1½ minute film, the three elves have to fight another three elves: Soggy, Mushy and Toughy. Ultimately, our heroes roll the bizzaro elves into a syrupy pancake and prepare Rice Krispie cereal for two boys sharing a sleep-over.

The film was made by Cartoon Films Ltd. This was the last incarnation of Ub Iweerks’ own studio. He was, at the time, making some short films for Columbia.


Soggy, Mushy and Toughy fight Snap Crackle & Pop

In 1939, the Kelloggs Corporation sent this letter which talks of other illustrations by Vernon Grant. Mother Goose rhymes were added to the package backs and became very popular. Kellogs sought to publish them.


(Click any image to enlarge.)


This is the subsequent book, which became
quite successful and is still available.

I’ll post the illustrations for the book tomorrow.
The letter and book are courtesy of Bill Peckmann to whom many thanks are offered.

One Response to “Snap Crackle Pop”

  1. on 30 Sep 2009 at 3:45 pm 1.Stephen Worth said …

    At the archive, I’m working on a 2 DVD set of films by Paul Fennell. He was the guy who took over the lead of Cartoon Films Ltd after Iwerks drifted away. Fennell and Ed Benedict were the ones who pitched the idea of one minute commercials for theaters to sponsors. They would provide them for free as filler cartoons. They did a bunch of them advertising a variety of products- Sterling Salt, Shell Oil, etc. Fennell went on to work in the First Motion Pictures Unit in WW2 and he had his own studios producing commercials in the early 50s. We were donated the entire film library of Paul Fennell. Amazing wartime training films, industrials, commercials and theatrical shorts.

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